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South West Heritage Trust

This page features a selection of short films produced for The South West Heritage Trust. These works were produced for: interpretative material to accompany exhibitions at The Museum of Somerset, video installations at the museum and as educational resources. Featured here are conventional interpretative pieces such as the film that describes the life and work of the artist Alfred Leete, there are also more experimental pieces such as ‘Machines’ (featured here), a three-dimensional film (when viewed through Anaglyph glasses) produced for the exhibition New Dimensions.

Faces of Conflict

A Video Triptych exhibited at The Museum of Somerset to mark the First World War centenary (exhibited Nov 2018 – March 2019)

Visitors to the exhibition experience an immersive audio-visual installation exploring the legacy of the conflict for Somerset people and the concept of remembrance. The installation features a mix of: Pathe footage, photographs from the stores at The Heritage Centre, letters sent home from the front line and newspaper cuttings.

Richard worked with the students to help facilitate their research and gain a greater understanding of this point in history, the students also learnt about video editing and how to produce Parallax images (a process that brings movement to still photographs).

Faces of Conflict has been produced in partnership with West Somerset College as part of the Adventures in Time project funded by Arts Council England.

Film to accompany an exhibition about the life and work of the artist Alfred Leete

In this short film the Curator of Art at The Imperial War Museum (Alex Walton) gives an insight into the life and work of the artist Alfred Leete, focusing in particular on his famous portrait of Lord Kitchener. Alex describes how the image was used as a recruiting poster during the first world war and explains how it inspired many ‘copycat’ images used to rally support for future conflicts.

Shot on location at The Imperial War Museum.

Colours of Exile, The Art of Hans Schwarz

Historian Paul Upton, biographer of Hans Schwarz, talks to Jenny Lance, Assistant Curator from University of Birmingham Research and Cultural Collections.

The film describes the status Hans achieved as an artist within his lifetime. It gives an insight into the artist’s early life in Austria, the rise of the Nazis and antisemitism and how the young 16 year old artist started a new life in England.

The film accompanied an exhibition of the artists landscape and portrait paintings at The Museum of Somerset.

 

Colours of Exile, The Art of Hans Schwarz (in brief)

Steve Minnit, Head of Museums for South West Heritage Trust, gives a brief introduction into the life and work of artist Hans Schwarz. Steve describes the status Hans achieved as an artist within his lifetime. The film gives an insight into the artist’s early life in Austria, which was then under the power of the third reich, and describes his journey to England. The film explains his connection with London, Birmingham and West Somerset.

The film accompanied an exhibition of the artists landscape and portrait paintings at The Museum of Somerset.

Colours of Exile, The Art of Hans Schwarz (the memories of friends)

Mike Bradshaw and Atha Murphy, childhood friends of Hans Schwarz, recount memories of meeting this extraordinary man in the West Somerset village Stogursey. Mike describes how peering through the window of the artists studio inspired his own decision to become an artist. Atha describes a man who was a “rebel” who was “not like most grown ups”.

The film accompanied an exhibition of the artists landscape and portrait paintings at The Museum of Somerset.

The World Before Yesterday

An insight into the photographer Stanley Kenyon with Kate Parr, Somerset Local Studies Librarian for South West Heritage. Kate describes the life and work of this prolific photographer. The film also features volunteers who describe the lengthy process of sifting through the photographers ledgers cataloguing thousands of negatives and prints.

The film accompanies an exhibition of Stanley Kenyon’s photographs at The Museum of Somerset.

Henry VII, The First Royal Portrait

Richard Kay, Picture Specialist with Lawrences Auctioneers, talks about the Tudor monarch. Richard describes this “instantly arresting” painting, on loan to The Museum of Somerset from The National Portrait Gallery, and gives it historical context. Richard explains how Henry VII confronted the pretender to the English throne Perkin Warbeck in the very room in which the painting is displayed at the museum. 

The film accompanied the exhibit at The Museum of Somerset.

New Dimensions – Contemporary Art Inspired by Hidden Objects

I describe the process involved in making Anaglygh photographs (pictures that appear three dimensional when viewed through Anaglyph glasses).

I created twenty anaglyph images, inspired by historical machinery kept in the stores at The Somerset Heritage Centre, for the exhibition New Dimensions. The images (printed as transparencies) were housed within archive boxes which were fitted with anaglyph lenses and illuminated from inside. Visitors to the gallery were invited to peer through the lenses into boxes that contained three dimensional ‘fictitious’ machines.

More on New Dimensions.

Henry VII, The First Royal Portrait (motion graphic sequence)

This motion graphic sequence accompanied an exhibition, at The Museum of Somerset, of a painting, on loan from The National Portrait Gallery, of Henry VII.

The, silent, sequence tells the story of an encounter between Henry VII and Perkin Warbeck, who claimed to be Richard, Duke of York, King Edward IV’s younger son. Warbeck’s attempt to take the throne from Henry VII failed at Taunton.

A Fragile Beauty: Art on the Blackdown Hills

A video installation to accompany the most iconic paintings produced by The Camden Town Group.

The Camden Town Group, led by Walter Sickert, was named after the London district where many of the artists lived and worked. Initially they painted contemporary urban life, but later they were drawn to the countryside, especially the Blackdown Hills. The group captured the beauty of this Somerset and Devon borderland in a period when the First World War was changing English society forever.

This video sequence attempts to capture some of the unkempt beauty of the location by walking in the footsteps of The Camden Town Group.

Wild Art

Somerset artists David and Andrew Neal talk about their childhood adventures, art and influences. They recount stories of: long nature walks, canoeing, sketching, large format photography, engineering, understanding how to ‘really’ observe nature and the museum they created as young boys ‘The Natural History of Living Things’.

The film accompanied the exhibition at The Museum of Somerset.

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Short educational films that reflect on Combat Stress during the First World War

These films were created as part of an educational resource for use at The Somerset Heritage Centre and the Museum of Somerset. The films feature Pathe footage that show an often distressing insight into post traumatic stress and combat stress.

With special thanks to Suzie Grogan, author and shell shock specialist.

Thousands of years of sound in Somerset, in two minutes

A simple two minute soundscape suggesting sounds that might be heard in Somerset, from the Ice Age to the present day.

An educational resource produced for The South West Heritage Trust.

© 2020 Richard Tomlinson
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